Euphyllia's 14gallon

Discussion in 'Tank Journals' started by Euphyllia, Oct 16, 2008.

  1. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    I have done 5, but tell me more about #7
     
  2. Gomer

    Gomer Honorary Member

    What is more to say than remove the black paint, add a light, and put macro into chamber 2? Highly recommend removing the bioballs, but that is me.
     
  3. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    So is the macro supposed to help by adding oxygen and catching debris?
     
  4. Gomer

    Gomer Honorary Member

    No, the macro is there to act as a nutrient export and when used in opposing lighting cycles, it helps to balance the pH fluctuation from CO2 change.
     
  5. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Oh. :- Ok
     
  6. tuberider

    tuberider Guest

    Basically you grow algae somewhere else besides in your tank, and yes you are balancing the oxygen/carbon dioxide so it does not change from lights on, to lights off. It serves two purposes, and works quite well.
     
  7. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Ok, so I remodeled the inside of it... I'll post a picture...
     
  8. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    I just took some pictures of my corals and different areas of the tank. I'll post them...
     
  9. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Australian Hammer Coral...
     
  10. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Neon Green Frog...
     
  11. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    Macro mode is your friend! Also cropping/shrinking when your picture is 8MP!
    ;)
     
  12. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Small 1.5" green frog w/ cloudy purple tipped tentacles...
     
  13. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Colt Coral Frags w/ anthellia in the background...
     
  14. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    Full Tank Shot...
     
  15. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    There is hair algae EVERYWHERE! I've tried everything I can do and It won't stop! I'm tired of taking it off by hand every single day. It is smothering my zoas and my frags and It won't stop! I have 2 full bags of phosphate remove in there and I added a poly filter and nothing has changed at all. The hair algae has ran out of space to spread to so now it is growing higher ans starting to smother my bigger corals. I can't bare to look at the aquarium and how ugly it has became. There is no possible way of stopping it so this is my plan.
    I'm going to go out and buy a lot of new live rock for a new rock structure and some water for a huge water change. I'm going to take all the coral out (that isn't infected with hair algae) and put it in a bucket with water and a heater to keep the water warm. Then I'm going to remove all the rocks from the tank and scrub all the hair algae off the glass, siphon the top layer of sand, and add a new layer of live sand. Then I'll do a 50% water change and clean all my filters and add live rock to the filter chambers. Then I'm going to put the new rock structure in and acclimate the corals from the bucket back in then tank. How does that sound? There is no possible other way I can think of to get rid of this mess of algae.
     
  16. Rick778

    Rick778 Guest

    You may want to try a sea hare before you take such drastic steps. It worked for me until I was able to get my tank under control.
     
  17. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    That was my other plan. But I thought sea hares require extremely stable water parameters. Once I'm done using the sea hare what do I do with it?
     
  18. bookfish

    bookfish Guest

    In all honesty, most reef tanks go through a succession of nuisance algae before they settle down. This takes a few months at least. Every time you add livestock you change the balance of the tank. Every time you change the water parameters suddenly you change the balance of the tank. Every time you change the way you maintain the tank, you probably change the balance of the tank. Saltwater critters thrive on stability. This stability only really comes after months of stable maintenance. I'm afraid that just starting over with new rock and a big water change but without correcting your approach to reefkeeping will continue to end in frustration. Many tanks don't really balance out for months after being set up. Every time you take a radical (impatient) approach to solving problems it leads to a destabilization of the system. Building a successful reef tank is a many years long endeavor. Every time you destabilize your system it takes many weeks or months to find a new balance point. How many times do you want to restart the clock?
     
  19. Euphyllia

    Euphyllia Guest

    So maybe redoing the tank isn't the best solution. Would a sea hare get the algae down until I can control it?
     
  20. Rick778

    Rick778 Guest

    I am only a novice -------- but, the sea hare took care of the algae I had and it never returned. You can always see if someone else could use it or return it to LFS when done.
     

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