Who has non-photosynth gorgonians?

Discussion in 'Coral' started by sfsuphysics, Mar 31, 2011.

  1. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    Just finished reading an article that Manhattan reefs does on their e-zine, and man some of those gorgonians look damn sexy and gave me a bit of an itch.

    So who has one of those "Azoo"(??) type tanks?
     
  2. Joost_

    Joost_ Guest

    I do, still have to setup the autofeeder though.
    If you wanna setup an azoox tank check this out:
    http://www.azoox.org/phpBB3/portal.php
     
  3. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    Yeah I've been peeking around the azoox site, just was curious how difficult they tended to be. I could always remember seeing at a LFS the "pretty" gorgonians which of course are non-photosynthetic, and thought that maybe a small fish-less tank so lots of water changes wouldn't be terribly difficult.

    I figured the autofeeder would be a necessity, is there any foods that don't need to be refrigerated that'd work though? Retrofitting a dorm fridge would be a huge deal breaker for me.
     
  4. houser

    houser Past President

    just trolled onto azoox for I think the second time since it was set up.

    I'm an equipment junkie and I dig those autofeeders! Real DIY innovation ongoing!
     
  5. treylane

    treylane Guest

    I had a swiftia for ~6mos and it really wasn't that much trouble... a few spot-feedings a week and it did great!
    [​IMG]

    Buuut, like every time I play with azoox, I eventually ran out of the energy to keep up with completely regular feedings and gave it to a friend with an interest in azoox gorgs.
     
  6. Joost_

    Joost_ Guest

    The difficulty really depends on the species, Cirrhipathes spiralis are probably the easiest to take care off since they take quite large foods such as chopped mysis. The next level would be gorgs like diogorgonia, and menella that take oysterfeast, rotifers, and cyclop-eeze and are quite hardy (compared to other NPS). Then there are a bunch of other gorgs such as Astrogorgia, swiftia etc. that take rotifers and such. Just stay away from the blueberry gorgonian.
    Fauna marin foods are usually dry foods
    It doesn't have to be ugly ;):
    http://i352.photobucket.com/albums/r332/Aquabacs/ARTISAN%2050%20G/IMG_1038.jpg
    (Michael Lukaczyn feeding system)
     
  7. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    Sounds like way more info is needed before I even consider taking them on.

    Didn't say anything about being ugly, its just those dorm fridges tend to be almost the same level of energy hogs as a full sized fridge.
     
  8. Joost_

    Joost_ Guest

    Great when you write a long reply and your browser freezes :tired:
    Anyways:
    -Gorgs will need a lot of flow, generally a lot more than any SPS can handle
    -Keep the tank dimly lit, although the corals generally couldn't care less, this will prevent algae growth
    -Tank should be fed 6-10 times a day, although some corals can do without less, you want them to be thriving not just surviving ;)
    -Food mixture should include small foods such as rotifers, shelfish diet, BBS, and cyclop-eeze. Fauna Marin foods can be used additionally or instead as well. Bulk frozen rotifers and cyclop-eeze can be found here.
    -If you plan on getting other critters as well phytoplankton dosing is a must as well
    -You generally want to keep your temperature at the lower end (72-74) although most will generally do fine at higher temperatures as well
    -Have some good filtration in place. An oversized skimmer, ozone, carbon dosing/biopellets can be very useful along with WC's
    -Definitely recommended to install a autofeeder, feeding 6 times a day can become quite a pain and will make vacations impossible.

    Some things worth reading:
    http://www.coralscience.org/main/articles/aquaculture-a-husbandry-4/filt...
    http://www.coralscience.org/main/articles/nutrition-5/azooxanthellate-co...

    Tunicates:
    http://www.coralscience.org/main/articles/reef-species-4/tunicates
    http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2005-03/rs/index.php
    Sea Apples
    http://www.advancedaquarist.com/issues/mar2003/invert.htm

    Black corals
    http://www.coralscience.org/main/articles/reef-species-4/black-corals-pa...
    http://www.coralscience.org/main/articles/reef-species-4/black-corals-pa...

    Crinoids:
    http://www.reefsmagazine.com/showthread.php?t=79032

    Food recipes:
    http://stonyreef.com/blog/2008/feeding-azooxanthellate-corals/
    http://www.ultimatereef.net/forums/showthread.php?t=257208

    and of course:
    www.azoox.org
    Considering the amount of energy usually used on lighting in photosynthetic tanks this shouldn't be something to worry about, especially if your getting an energy rated one.
     
  9. houser

    houser Past President

    Damn Joost - stop tempting us to the dark side...
    Nice writeup!
     
  10. Joost_

    Joost_ Guest

    :p
    Some inspiration ;):
    [​IMG]
    http://reefbuilders.com/2011/01/10/nonphotosynthetic-reef-tank-mike-cao/
     
  11. hiepatitis

    hiepatitis Guest

    How do you keep all that food from polluting the water?
     
  12. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    heavy duty skimmer, GAC, GFO, and water changes to a level that would make an SPS tank owner go "WTF that's a lot of water changes"
     
  13. GreshamH

    GreshamH Guest

    Which costs a ton and with the added feeding cost, your looking at the same cost as a SPS tank for the most part :( The hands on is just as much, if not more. definitely not for the timid :D
     
  14. Gomer

    Gomer Honorary Member

    would big bioreactors work? Not only as an export, but axillary food source with increased free floating bacteria??
     
  15. GreshamH

    GreshamH Guest

    Not for animals that feed higher on the food chain like most gorg's do ;) For other azoox animals that is a fine suggestion.
     
  16. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    To go along with what Tony is thinking, I wonder if it would be possible to get away with using a refugium as your food source, just one that is many times larger than the Azoo tank itself.
     
  17. GreshamH

    GreshamH Guest

    Nope, not from what I have seen. Chuck S. had an amaxing NPS tank. Thw fuge was double the volume of his tank and extremely productive. He still had to feed a TON. I do not think you two fully grasp how much they actually need to consume daily.
     
  18. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    Well that's why I said many times more larger.. I'm talking 100g fuge for a nano tank, of which its not very feasible unless you make the fuge a 'pretty' fuge.. aka planted tank. I figure it's very similar to how the whole food chain works in general, many many smaller creatures get eaten by a larger one, then many of those need to feed a larger still etc.

    One gorgonian in a 50 gallon tank :D
     
  19. Gomer

    Gomer Honorary Member

    Well, that's why I said auxiliary food supply :p

    I still drool over these tanks (not as an auxiliary food supply)
     
  20. GreshamH

    GreshamH Guest

    Food web ;) Many of the little things eat each other as well.

    Chuck had like a 150 with a 300g sump. The tank had a very small bioload. The size was for volume to help with water quality.
     

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