Peter's Garage Tank

Discussion in 'Tank Journals' started by Mark B, May 27, 2017.

  1. ashburn2k

    ashburn2k Supporting Member

    I'd consider bristle worms beneficial


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  2. Mark B

    Mark B Supporting Member

    Then why do they sell traps for them?
     
  3. ashburn2k

    ashburn2k Supporting Member

    Because their wives thinks worms are ugly?


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  4. RandyC

    RandyC Supporting Member

    Once they're in, they're in. Your only choice is to manage them. Manual removal or having something eat them are your choices (kalk paste, Joe's juice, or Peppermint shrimp for aiptasia - file fish can work too, but they're less reef safe than pepps from what I understand).

    For bristleworms, some people have had success with six line wrasses to keep numbers in check. Bristleworms typically aren't bad and are detritivores, but they can grow to infestation levels if nothing is keeping the numbers down.

    This is one reason some swear by only starting from dry rocks....Me being one of them. While you can't avoid everything since you're bringing in frags, your chances are much, much less.
     
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  5. Coral reefer

    Coral reefer President

    Remove rocks and start over w dry rocks or acid wash them and re use.
    Or...get peppermint shrimps and arrow crab and live with a non perfect tank. Aiptasia and bristles will likely always be there, but hopefully kept in check.
    If it were me and a new setup I'd start over.
    In an ongoing system neither of those things are that bad and I'd try to control them w peppermint shrimp (probably 3) and and arrow crab for the worms.
     
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  6. Mark B

    Mark B Supporting Member

    I think we will grab some shrimps and call it a day.
     
  7. Wlachnit

    Wlachnit Supporting Member

    I agree with Mike here.
     
  8. Mark B

    Mark B Supporting Member

    Acid wash? What about all of the corals (there is a ton of a lot of different sps, softies, and lps)
     
  9. Kremis

    Kremis Supporting Member

    honestly the small bristle worms are ok, but i pulled a foot long one out of my 28 gallon nano a few years ago. highly doubt that was beneficial..
     
  10. Mark B

    Mark B Supporting Member

    My turtle wishes I would find one that big
     
  11. Gablami

    Gablami Supporting Member

    I would start over too. You're not that far into it. No guarantees with peppermint shrimp. Some need to be trained to eat aiptasia. Don't want to start a new build with an aiptasia infestation. Take the live coral, inspect carefully, take off all plugs and move into a new tank. Nuke the rest.

    Tough decision for you and Peter. I can see how it's so tempting just to try to roll through it.


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  12. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    IMO, biological methods of control at best do only that, control it, they will never eradicate it. Granted with the right creatures you could possibly keep them under control enough that they become a non issue, but in my experience as soon as the "controller" dies off whether it's peppermint shrimp, nudibranchs, or butterfly fish then that 1 little missed one will start the problem over again.

    The best way to do it, unfortunately will make your live rock not so live, and it involves bleach. I consider it the nuclear option, but it is one that will make sure you don't have this problem.
     
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  13. Kremis

    Kremis Supporting Member

    i have had aiptasia in my 28 gallon nano for 4 years it has never gotten out of control. just aptasia x frequently it keeps the population down
     
  14. Wlachnit

    Wlachnit Supporting Member

    As @Gablami stated, you could try to pull off as many of the corals and inspect them, and remount them to clean frag mounts or pieces of dry rubble.
     
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  15. Flagg37

    Flagg37 Officer at large

    That was one of you splendid garden eels not a bristle worm ;).
     
  16. Gablami

    Gablami Supporting Member

    One more tip is if you are trying to remove the aiptasia by scraping them off the rock, you may be inadvertently propagating the pest as they reproduce by breaking off small portions of themselves at the base of their stalk. Recommend burying in superglue, killing chemically (kalk or injections) or removing rocks entirely (probably too late for this).


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  17. Flagg37

    Flagg37 Officer at large

    I've had good experience with kalk paste.
     
  18. Mark B

    Mark B Supporting Member

    Good info. guys - Thanks. Ran down to Neptunes today and picked up a couple of Peppermint shrimp and a couple crabs that eat bubble algae. Also picked up some fuel for my 2,000 degree pencil torch.
    The hole in the rock has 5 Aiptasia

    1.png
    Add 2,000 degrees for a moment and
    2.png
    the hole is now barren.
    33.png
     
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  19. Gablami

    Gablami Supporting Member

    That works underwater huh? I've seen people use lasers and stuff, but this seems even more effective, for the spots you can reach at least. I'm sure you could blast those vermatid snails too :)


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  20. ashburn2k

    ashburn2k Supporting Member

    thats some big aiptasia
     

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