Reef nutrition

October 2020 RODI system recommendations

borker

Supporting Member
Going to replace my 3 stage RO Buddie.

What does everyone here use and recommend, in particular for SF water which is already pretty clean?

Key features for me:
* not crazy expensive
* inline valves so I can know when to replace filters

Have seen various recs here for BRS/Koolermax etc. but would love to hear what people suggest.


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borker

Supporting Member
Not sure - but I’d just use prime vs a filter if I did.


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Coral reefer

BOD
Staff member
You’ve lost I’ve twice so far.
Inline valves? Do you mean pressure gauge?
Yes you have chloramines. Prime instead of a filter? This thread is about a filter...
You want To use chloramine specific carbon block(s)
 

borker

Supporting Member
Yes I meant pressure gauge, brain fart.

My point on chloramines is I’d rather get a higher output or cheaper rodi and just add Prime to the output vs. mechanically or chemically filter it in the RODI which is much harder to do I read.


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Coral reefer

BOD
Staff member
Yes I meant pressure gauge, brain fart.

My point on chloramines is I’d rather get a higher output or cheaper rodi and just add Prime to the output vs. mechanically or chemically filter it in the RODI which is much harder to do I read.


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You dont get how they work I don’t think. Chloramine will ruin your membrane. You need to filter it out. It isn’t hard.
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
You absolutely need carbon filters for SF water, we do have chloramines, and you need to filter those out before your membrane. "SF water is pretty clean" is a TDS thing, which unless it's super high isn't really a sign of cleanliness, it's just a relatively easy measurable we can look at.

There aren't really any gauges to tell you when it's time to change filters either, TDS meter sure, but that is only for your RO membrane or your DI resin. You can buy a flow meter to record how many gallons go through your filters, but that's not really a sign of if they need to be charged because depending upon how aggressively water is "cleaned" they may go sooner rather than later. Sediment filters can be visually inspected for replacement, but carbon filters the best you can do is put in a TEE between filters with a valve to take water samples and then use something like a chlorine test strip. Or the best solution is to not try and squeeze every last useful molecule of carbon from your prefilters just swap them on a 6 month* basis and call it a day. *or whatever time period due to your total water usage if you use it for a 300 gallon system you'll burn through filters much quicker than if you use it for a 30 gallon system most likely.

That said if you want to ditch the RO filter idea and have zero waste, you can simply use tap water plus prime, and maybe set up some sediment filters with a pump loop to clean out any larger garbage in the water column.
 

rygh

Webmaster
Staff member
Suggest:
https://www.bulkreefsupply.com/5-st...ver-ro-di-system-bulk-reef-supply-bundle.html

But, change stage 3 to a second carbon.
  • Stage One - Sediment filter
  • Stage Two - Pentek ChlorPlus carbon block (or similar chloramine carbon)
  • Stage Three - Pentek ChlorPlus carbon block (or similar chloramine carbon)

Various pressure gauages and TDI monitors are fun, but they only show part of the problem.
You are better just replace things regularly.

Having water saver in SF area is a good upgrade.
 

borker

Supporting Member
That said if you want to ditch the RO filter idea and have zero waste, you can simply use tap water plus prime, and maybe set up some sediment filters with a pump loop to clean out any larger garbage in the water column.
This was my question — why not do this? It seems cheaper and MUCH easier??


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sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
This was my question — why not do this? It seems cheaper and MUCH easier??
You could, the main draw back is the purity of the water. Yes you can get out chloramines with prime, and sure if you used a sediment filter you can get out bigger chunky stuff, but the smaller stuff will get through, whatever your TDS is before starting any treatment will be after. Now if I was doing a fish only system, or maybe a softie tank I might decide to go this way, hell my soft tanks of the past I've gone very long time periods between water changes which probably isn't any different than just using dirtier water from the start.
 

borker

Supporting Member
So to make sure I understand:
1. SF tap has near 0 tds
2. But it has chlorine
3. And occasional large sediment / solids that need filtering?

Not sure I understand how 1 and 3 are consistent but should probably educate myself!!!


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Srt4eric

Supporting Member
So to make sure I understand:
1. SF tap has near 0 tds
2. But it has chlorine
3. And occasional large sediment / solids that need filtering?

Not sure I understand how 1 and 3 are consistent but should probably educate myself!!!


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Impossible to have near 0 tds. Just traveling through the pipes if would pick up all kinds of stuff.
 

max_nano

Supporting Member
I have 20-50 tds tap in Sf. I went for a smaller micron carbon and sediment filter. I believe that improves the life of the resin and membrane? But I plan on adding another membrane to improve production:waste ratio, but I have high pressure, I believe. I will add a pressure gauge first.
 

sfsuphysics

BOD
Staff member
So to make sure I understand:
1. SF tap has near 0 tds
2. But it has chlorine
3. And occasional large sediment / solids that need filtering?

Not sure I understand how 1 and 3 are consistent but should probably educate myself!!!
Ok 3 is fairly easy, dirt, clay, rust, whatever bigger chunks that may get into your water system if you've never done it unscrew the aerator on any faucet and you'll probably see a bunch of gunk inside. This can happen due to old pipes, whenever the city works on the sewage system, or any number of things, I think the BRS even have shown that running various "solutions" (2 part, et.al) that may be a bit impure through a sediment filter they can remove quite a bit of gunk. And it really is unrelated to #1

Have you measured 0 tds from a faucet? While SF water is fairly good compared to some areas, 0 is unthinkably low. Those water reports are nice, but again there are other things that can affect that, heavy rain for instance very often can change your TDS. But TDS, (total dissolved solids) that encompasses quite a bit, bicarbonates, calcium and magnesium are things we absolutely would love to keep, but other lesser desirables like lead, zinc, sulfates, probably not so much.
 
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