Help with New UV setup

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by The_Lazy_Reefer, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Hey just purchased the aqua uv 15watt off marine depot and will be plumping it from a T off my return pump. Anybody use this unit and have any pro tips on installation? Any info is appreciated TIA![​IMG]


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  2. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Total water volume of the system is around 60-65 gallons.


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  3. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    [​IMG] I’m thinking of running it at 350gph which puts me at 60,000 uw/cm2 and a turnover of 5x water volume.


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  4. At that flow rate it will be useful for bacteria and algae, but not for protozoa's. You will need to be in 75gph max range to inhibit Ich, etc. Frankly, you should use the 25w unit for your size tank.
     
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  5. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Wha
    what flow rate would you run the 25 watt at? I’ll probably return it and upgrade to the 25 watt if that’s what you recommend
     
  6. About 100-125gph on the 25 watt.
     
  7. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Any negative effects on copepod populations at those sterilization levels?
     
  8. Nope. For the most part copepods in our reef tanks are benthic and live in our rocks, etc. They never pass through the sterilizer.
     
  9. Btw this would e a fine discussion to have with Chad of reef nutrition at the upcoming BAR event. He is known worldwide as the "Copegod" for a reason and will be talking in-depth about them at the BBQ.
     
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  10. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Yea I’m going to be there so I will be sure to ask him his opinion on the topic.Good idea man! I went ahead and got the 25 watt version and will start it out at 180 gph(ish) and see how it goes. Or do you recommend starting it lower as I’m worried about over doing it.


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  11. You can't over do it.Start slower. I always use the lowest amount recommended. Exposure time is key and that means slow....
     
  12. I thought I should add this isn't one of those "I'll watch it and see how it goes." By definition protozoan's are single cell and animals and we can't see them, but there's a lot of excellent science on UV and protozaons and how much exposure time is needed -- so we trust the science.
     
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  13. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Ah yea I see your point there where there’s really no tell tale signs to help “dial” it in, so I’ll trust the science as you say and aim for about 130gph which if I’m off by a little bit either way will still be in the ballpark for effective for protozoan reduction
     
  14. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    Thanks for the help/info, I almost started off on the wrong foot with an undersized unit so that’s much appreciated.
     
  15. The one I just bought is 80w and four feet long. Exposure time is everything and the myth that you strip stuff out o the tank is ... well... a myth.
     
  16. sfsuphysics

    sfsuphysics Supporting Member

    yeah UV isn't like a protein skimmer where it'll eventually get to all the water by cleaning up a little a time. All you do with UV is give stuff a suntan if you run it through too quickly and all the "turnovers" per hour you do isn't going to make it work any better.
     
  17. jccaclimber

    jccaclimber Supporting Member

    Assuming your drain is throttled or runs partial siphon (sucks air), put it on the drain, not the return pump. Adding it to the return pump decreases the flow through the sump as the return pump now has to push against extra resistance. Putting it on the drain side gravity is doing the work for you.
    Downsides to this:
    1) Obviously that doesn't apply if you are near capacity on your drain, but if that's the case you have a ticking time bomb anyways.
    2) Doesn't get everything if you have more than one drain, although that does make it easier to tune flow rate.
    3) Consider plumbing in a way that is both easy to drain when you need to open it and change the bulb as well as a way where it stays full if the return pump dies. There was a recent thread about this.
     
  18. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    [​IMG]Definitly going for the recommended flow of 125ish gph. Here’s my sump and there’s a gate valve off the return I was planning to use and run the UV off that so I should be able to dial the flow in exactly with that. The L1 is only running on the 3rd led so theres plenty off oomph to spare so I think this should work nicely?


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  19. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    [​IMG]


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  20. The_Lazy_Reefer

    The_Lazy_Reefer Supporting Member

    [​IMG]Well I hit my first snag I think. So I grabbed a 3/4 schedule 80 union to connect to the plumbing on the return.(bought the tank used so I just assumed it was normal. I noticed that the piece on the return currently should have an o-ring? Or are there unions in the world without them. I’m considering just putting an o-ring inside and telfoning the hell out of the threads to see what happens


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