Kessil

Tanks Alk consumption has increased 30% over the last 15 days

Vhuang168

Supporting Member
At some point, a CaRx is the answer. I ran a CaRx in a 40b that was full sps. Was dripping 50ml/min at 6.6pH.
 
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Ibn

Guest
It doesn't need to be under the tank or near the tank. You can place it next to it or in a remote location and run tubing to and from the reactor. RO tubing isn't hard to hide.
 

Blaise006

Supporting Member
So what are the dangers for someone unfamiliar with CaRx?

Like what is something that is likely to go wrong that I need to pay close attention to?

Suggestions on transitioning from dosing to carx?
 

Coral reefer

DBTC Officer
BOD
So what are the dangers for someone unfamiliar with CaRx?

Like what is something that is likely to go wrong that I need to pay close attention to?

Suggestions on transitioning from dosing to carx?
Lots of issues potentially. Get a high quality unit with high quality regulator or carbon dosing and high quality feed pump like medical grade peristaltic pump.
 

Blaise006

Supporting Member
Lots of issues potentially. Get a high quality unit with high quality regulator or carbon dosing and high quality feed pump like medical grade peristaltic pump.
There seems to be a lot I have to learn if I want to transition to a CaRx. I just checked out geo and it has a bunch of parts I’m unfamiliar with. Some check valves, feed pumps, something called a carbon doser, etc.

Is there functionality with APEX?
 

Ibn

Guest
The transition requires a few key components, being:
1. Feed pump. Get a decent peristaltic pump. Traditionally this comprises mostly of the Masterflex line of pumps, but nowadays you can use Kamoer STP, Ecotech Versa, etc. This needs to be reliable since it's going to be on constantly, and possibly on/off depending on how you want to run your reactor.
2. Carbondoser. Just a name of one of the regulators/solenoid that you can purchase. It's a single stage brass regulator for the most part but is rather user friendly if you've never dealt with one before. You can substitute this out for dual stage stainless steel regulator for the looks and functionality at a higher cost. Primary use to adjust the amount and speed of the co2 being added to the CaRx. Check valve is installed on the co2 line so that water doesn't backflow and wrecks your regulator/solenoid.
3. CaRx. The main body that houses the media (e.g., coral rubble) which will be melted when the co2 mixes and drops the pH of the chamber down to a level that will melt the media. This is the main body where co2 and your tank water is fed. The recirculating pump attached to the reactor ensures that the co2 that goes in is mixed.

As for the Apex, it's used to optionally control all 3 components above:
1. Feed pump. When it's on/off. Corals for the most part don't use much if anything during the hours when it's dark, so you can use the Apex as a timer for when to turn on/off. Most feed pumps has their own controller/adjustments for how much water is going through to the reactor. The feeder basically adjust how much you're dosing into your tank.
2. Carbondoser. If you have a secondary pH probe, then the Apex can control the solenoid on the regulator to keep the pH within a specific range to melt the media. There are ways to tune a reactor without a need for a secondary pH probe, but it does require you to test the alk of the effluent.
3. Only thing that the Apex controls on the reactor is just the circulating pump. You can use the Apex as a timer to turn the recirculation pump off at nights as it's not really needed.

Since you already own a Trident, it's actually quite easy to tune a reactor once it's set up.
 

Blaise006

Supporting Member
I
The transition requires a few key components, being:
1. Feed pump. Get a decent peristaltic pump. Traditionally this comprises mostly of the Masterflex line of pumps, but nowadays you can use Kamoer STP, Ecotech Versa, etc. This needs to be reliable since it's going to be on constantly, and possibly on/off depending on how you want to run your reactor.
2. Carbondoser. Just a name of one of the regulators/solenoid that you can purchase. It's a single stage brass regulator for the most part but is rather user friendly if you've never dealt with one before. You can substitute this out for dual stage stainless steel regulator for the looks and functionality at a higher cost. Primary use to adjust the amount and speed of the co2 being added to the CaRx. Check valve is installed on the co2 line so that water doesn't backflow and wrecks your regulator/solenoid.
3. CaRx. The main body that houses the media (e.g., coral rubble) which will be melted when the co2 mixes and drops the pH of the chamber down to a level that will melt the media. This is the main body where co2 and your tank water is fed. The recirculating pump attached to the reactor ensures that the co2 that goes in is mixed.

As for the Apex, it's used to optionally control all 3 components above:
1. Feed pump. When it's on/off. Corals for the most part don't use much if anything during the hours when it's dark, so you can use the Apex as a timer for when to turn on/off. Most feed pumps has their own controller/adjustments for how much water is going through to the reactor. The feeder basically adjust how much you're dosing into your tank.
2. Carbondoser. If you have a secondary pH probe, then the Apex can control the solenoid on the regulator to keep the pH within a specific range to melt the media. There are ways to tune a reactor without a need for a secondary pH probe, but it does require you to test the alk of the effluent.
3. Only thing that the Apex controls on the reactor is just the circulating pump. You can use the Apex as a timer to turn the recirculation pump off at nights as it's not really needed.

Since you already own a Trident, it's actually quite easy to tune a reactor once it's set up.
I appreciate this thorough response.

1) Is it possible to run a CaRx and maintain PH above 8?

2) What are the equipment pieces that you would consider the most important to ensure the unit is operating effectively?

3) Are there any redundancies worth considering?

4) Roughly 40% of my dosing happens between 9pm and 7am to maintain calcium and alk. I assume under that structure I would leave the feed pumps and doser on, correct?

Thank you again for taking time to draft that response.
 

Plankton

Supporting Member
There seems to be a lot I have to learn if I want to transition to a CaRx. I just checked out geo and it has a bunch of parts I’m unfamiliar with. Some check valves, feed pumps, something called a carbon doser, etc.

Is there functionality with APEX?
Yup and when I ran my 210 with CaRx refilling those CO2 bottles was expensive. If you do don’t bother with tini tiny baby bottle get the large ones because it will cost about the same to refill.
 

Vhuang168

Supporting Member
There seems to be a lot I have to learn if I want to transition to a CaRx. I just checked out geo and it has a bunch of parts I’m unfamiliar with. Some check valves, feed pumps, something called a carbon doser, etc.

Is there functionality with APEX?
Its not that difficult really. As with any additive dosing, there is the danger of overdoing it.

You basically have a stand alone CaRx system that provides you the Alk/Ca and various trace elements. You then 'dose' based on needs.

The CaRx system uses low pH to 'melt' the media, you control the pH by injecting CO2 from a CO2 bottle. That is usually regulated by a solenoid attached to a pH controller. There is a pH probe somewhere in the chamber to provides the pH level to the controller.

You 'dose' from the CaRx system by either feeding it water from your tank or drawing water from the CaRx system.
When feed from tank, you take water from tank and push it into the CaRx system. Which then forces out Alk/Ca heavy water from the CaRx system and back into the tank.
When you draw from the CaRx system, the CaRx system then draws from the tank due to the suction.
 
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Blaise006

Supporting Member
I just priced out a geo cal reactor and with everything it was close to 1k. That’s a lot right after dropping a bunch of money into a new 125.
 

jhuynh

Supporting Member
I just priced out a geo cal reactor and with everything it was close to 1k. That’s a lot right after dropping a bunch of money into a new 125.
sounds about right... did you price out a geo 612, kamoer fx-stp, and carbon doser?
 
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